“Green Growth” getting stronger: GGGI to become an international organization Reply

Representatives of sixteen countries have gathered on June 20 at a side-event of the Rio+20 conference – Signing Ceremony for the Agreement on the Establishment of GGGI – to officially establish the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) as an international organization. The signatories of the Establishment Agreement – Australia, Cambodia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ethiopia, Guyana, Kiribati, Korea, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, the Philippines, Qatar, the UAE, the United Kingdom, and Vietnam – will become the founding members of GGGI when it launches as a new international organization in October this year.

GGGI has been operational since 2010 with headquarters in Seoul, Republic of Korea. GGGI’s main aim has been to pioneer “Green Growth” as a new model of environmentally sustainable economic growth and its conversion into an international organization is a step forward to spread this economic model further around the world.

GGGI partners with developing countries and emerging economies, including least developed countries, to develop green growth strategies and plans that deliver poverty reduction, job creation and social inclusion in an environmentally sustainable way.  The Institute currently works in ten countries, including Brazil, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Thailand and UAE, and is expected to expand its set of partner countries in coming years.

Links: GGGI website

Advertisements

“Earth Debates” at the Natural History Museum, UK Reply

In the build up to the Rio+20 conference, a series of four debates were held at the Natural History Museum, UK. The debates, organised by a partnership of the Natural History Museum, Stakeholder Forum and British Council, focused on key issues at the heart of the Rio+20 conference green economy agenda. The four events, featuring discussions of a panel of leading UK experts, were titled: 1. “Ecosystem Economics – can we put a price on nature?” (25 March 2012), 2. “Beyond GDP – how can we measure progress?” (22 February 2012), 3. “Green Cities in a green economy – how to pioneer a sustainable transition?” (14 March 2012), and 4. “Food Security – how do we feed 9 billion in 2050?” (11 April 2012).

It is possible to watch the full debates at the website of the Natural History Museum.

Link: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/biodiversity/earth-debates